pail

I did
I already did the things I wanted to do
that’s what being young is about
I’m not sure where we got all these adults
on the bucket list bandwagon
feeling short changed
wondering where time went
following the leader of risk takers
those who believe adrenalin is needed to rush
pulling out the stops

I think about all the fun of growing up
the experiences
falling down
standing
deciding on something to do and doing it

lists are for groceries
if you need one to give you courage
then look no farther than a sunny day
and a beckoning horizon

instead we have people deciding time is a thing to be filled
list of notions crammed and worried adventure relegated to the path of others

counting desires
plotting things to do before you die
these Lords of bucket
forget one thing:  will lose the element that is necessary
for any high class adventure …… to believe you won’t

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4 thoughts on “pail

  1. Don MacIver, RPA, Writer, Author, Poet

    “Bucket List” is a mere pair of buzz words/phrase so overused in this day. Is life less fulfilling in the absence of documented desires? In the sales world one is taught that goals must be written down, in your face to remain until each goal is achieved and not resignedly scratched off or erased for in that event one’s goes would seldom be realized and one would ultimately condemn their souls to a loser’s hell awaiting.

    Does one set themselves up for huge disappointment, loss of self worth/esteem were all the touch points on the List not checked off in victorious acknowledgement? I would hope not. Goals serve their purpose and stimulate a desire to achieve yet in the end if, in this day, we manager to care sufficiently for our health so as to live a good long life (pray free of terminal illness/disease that would destroy all hopes for conquering that bucket list by default) and we live to know a good measure of self-respect and dignity then perhaps those are the greater achievements than all.

    Having been a facility manager in retirement properties I have come to know the gift of one’s self-worth come one’s final days in this world, the smile of acceptance and inner peace in the eyes of the elderly as they prepare for their next journey.

    I think in our society and cultures we pressure ourselves to create and conquer those bucket lists through the eyes of others. Many would crave the reward of public recognition as a significant social standard and acceptance. I blame our fellow human beings that glorify the ‘divide and conquer’ mentality of setting goals for achievement at any cost as the only way to live ones life with success and happiness and the media feeds off that ‘positive energy’, which it well can be to a degree, and spins it into a ‘must have’ in one’s life.

    Rather than a list of mountains to climb or places to see my ‘bucket list’ would be filled with living to see the resolve of so many issues like poverty, disease, hunger, crime, violence, prejudice and hatred, intolerance…the many things about our lives that seem insurmountable that if we truly dedicated greater energies to those causes our collective sense of self-worth and achievement would render political platform and social inequities insignificant in the bigger picture.

    • eebrinker

      certainly the world needs a better look at REAL ways to improve things for all, just not the few. i always thought it was funny that my husband had planned to be a millionaire by such and such age. he died in a car accident. life is about being nice to other people when and if you can…..

      • Don MacIver, RPA, Writer, Author, Poet

        Oh no Eileen, I’m so sorry for what you have gone through. In recent years Andrea and I find ourselves migrating to smaller cities with a much greater sense of community and for all that we will never look back nor be disappointed in decisions made. A young man actually greeted me in a restaurant today, not knowing me from Adam, with the nicest, most sincere voice of friendship. It took me by surprise but it was so nice to experience for a change.

        • eebrinker

          mostly i like the sense of community i get of late with the methodist church. have lost many people in my life, Don…..try to be thankful for the time we did have. the one thing is that your own mortality feels more pronounced. not exactly a fear of death, but a greater acceptance of the inevitable.

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